Making of a Global World Class 10 Q&A: Your Ultimate Guide

Welcome to a valuable resource tailored for Class 10 Social Science students as we explore the intricacies of History Chapter 3, "Making of a Global World." In line with the latest CBSE 2023-24 curriculum, we have compiled a comprehensive set of important questions and answers to serve as your ultimate guide in mastering this chapter. Whether you're preparing for exams or seeking a deeper understanding of the subject, our "Making of a Global World Class 10 Q&A" blog post is here to support your educational journey.

the making of a global world class 10 questions answers

SubjectSocial Science (History)
Class10
BoardCBSE and State Boards
Chapter No.3
Chapter NameThe Making of a Global World
TypeImportant Questions & Answers
Session2023-24
Weightage 1-2 marks

"अगर आप सपने नहीं देखेंगे तो उन्हें पूरा कैसे कर पाएंगे?"

- दृढ़ता सिंह

The Making of a Global World Class 10 Important Questions & Answers

Q. No. 1) Multiple Choice Questions:

i. ‘Silk routes’ are known to have existed before the ________ and thrived almost till the _______.

a. Christian era, 14th-century

b. Christian era, 15th-century

c. Christian era, 16th-century

d. Christian era, 17th-century

Ans. Option (b).

Q. No. 2) “The silk routes are a good example of pre-modern trade and cultural links between distant parts of the world.” Explain with examples.

Ans. The silk routes are a good example of vibrant pre-modern trade and cultural links between distant parts of the world:

  • Historians have identified several silk routes over land and by sea connecting vast regions of Asia with Europe and northern Africa.
  • The name ‘silk routes’ points out the importance of West-bound Chinese silk cargoes along this route.
  • Chinese pottery also traveled the same route, as did textiles and spices from India and Southeast Asia.
  • In return, precious metals (gold and silver) flowed from Europe to Asia.
  • Early Christian missionaries and Muslim preachers traveled this route to Asia. Much before all this, Buddhism from Eastern India spread in several directions through intersecting points on the silk routes.
Q. No. 3) ‘Even ‘ready’ foodstuff in distant parts of the world might share common origins.’ Justify the statement with a relevant example.

Ans.

  • It is believed that Arab traders took pasta to fifth-century Sicily, an island now in Italy.
  • It is believed that noodles traveled west from China to become spaghetti.
Q. No. 4) Illustrate with examples that food offers many opportunities for long-distance cultural exchange.

Or,

“Traders and travelers introduced new crops to lands they traveled.“ Substantiate this statement with illustrations.

Ans.

  • Traders and travelers introduced new crops to the lands they traveled.
  • Even ‘ready’ foodstuff in distant parts of the world might share common origins like spaghetti and noodles or, perhaps, Arab traders took pasta to 5th century Sicily, an island now in Italy.
  • Similar foods were also known in India and Japan, so the truth about their origins may never be known. Yet such guesswork suggests the possibilities of long-distance cultural contact even in the pre-modern world.
  • Many of our common foods such as potatoes, soya, groundnuts, maize, tomatoes, chilies, sweet potatoes, and so on were not known to our ancestors until about five centuries ago.
  • These foods were only introduced in Europe and Asia after Christopher Columbus accidentally discovered the vast continent that would later become known as the Americas.
Q. No. 5) The Spanish conquest and colonization of America were decisively underway by the mid-sixteenth century. Explain with examples.
Or,
How did the global transfer of disease in the pre-modern world help in the colonization of the Americas?

Or,

“The most powerful weapon of the Spanish conqueror was not a conventional military weapon at all”. Justify the above statement by giving two reasons.

Ans. The Spanish conqueror’s most powerful weapon was not a conventional military weapon because

  • they used germs like smallpox which spread deep into the continent before any European could reach there.
  • America's original inhabitants had no immunity against these diseases that came from Europe. This disease erased the whole community, leading to conquest. This biological warfare in the mid-sixteenth century made it easy for the Spanish to overpower the Americans.
Q. No. 6) Why did Europeans flee to America in the 19th century? Explain.
Or,
Why did merchants move to the countryside of Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? Explain.

Ans. European flee to America in the 19th century:

  • Poverty and hunger were common in Europe.
  • Cities were crowded and deadly diseases were widespread.
  • Religious conflicts were common and religious dissenters were persecuted.
  • Therefore, thousands fled Europe for America where plantations were worked by slaves captured in Africa for growing cotton and sugar for European markets.

In case you need important questions and answers to the whole chapter, you can download it here: Click here

Must Read: The Making of a Global World Class 10 Notes
The Making of a Global World Class 10 NCERT Underlined PDF
Must Read:
Class 10 Revision Notes
Class 10 Important Questions

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11 thoughts on “Making of a Global World Class 10 Q&A: Your Ultimate Guide”

  1. Sir please provide me this answer

    Trade flourished and markets expanded in the late 19 century but there was darker side to this process. Comment

    Reply
    • Trade flourished and markets expanded in the late 19 century but there was a darker side to this process. Comment.
      Ans. i. In many parts of the world, the expansion of trade and a closer relationship with the world economy also meant a loss of freedoms and livelihoods.
      ii. Late nineteenth-century European conquests produced many painful economic, social, and ecological changes through which the colonized societies were brought into the world economy.
      iii. In 1885 the big European powers met in Berlin to complete the carving up of Africa between them.
      iv. Britain and France made vast additions to their overseas territories in the late nineteenth century.
      v. Belgium and Germany became new colonial powers. The US also became a colonial power in the late 1890s by taking over some colonies earlier held by Spain.

      Reply
    • The US was the most severely affected by the depression.

      i. With the fall in prices and the prospect of a depression, US banks had also slashed domestic lending and called back loans.
      ii. Farms could not sell their harvests, households were ruined, and businesses collapsed.
      iii. Faced with falling incomes, many households in the US could not repay what they had borrowed, and were forced to give up their homes, cars and other consumer durables.
      iv. As unemployment soared, people trudged long distances looking for any work they could find.
      v. Ultimately, the US banking system itself collapsed. Unable to recover investments, collect loans and repay depositors, thousands of banks went bankrupt and were forced to close.

      Reply
  2. Hi Sir
    thank you so much for your effort towards this. I cant explain how much this helped me in studying for my pre boards and i suggested this website to all my friends

    Reply

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