A Roadside Stand: Important Questions and Answers for Class 12

If you're studying Class 12 English and need important questions and answers for the Flamingo Chapter 4 poem "A Roadside Stand" by Robert Frost, you're in the right place. This guide provides a comprehensive collection of important questions and their answers to help you prepare for your exams.

a roadside stand class 12 important  questions answers

SubjectEnglish Language & Literature
Class12
BoardCBSE & State Boards
Chapter NameA Roadside Stand
TypeImportant Questions and Answers
Session2023-24
Book NameFlamingo (Poem 4)
LiteraturePoem

"Don't wait for the perfect moment, take the moment and make it perfect."

- Zoey Sayward

A Roadside Stand Class 12 Important Questions with Answers

Q. No. 1) Multiple Choice Questions based on an extract.

The polished traffic passed with a mind ahead,
Or if ever aside a moment, then out of sorts
At having the landscape marred with the artless paint
Of signs that with N turned wrong and S turned wrong…

i. The polished traffic in particular refers to the

a. sophisticated city dwellers in their vehicles.

b. shiny cars that the poet sees on the road.

c. extremely affluent people living in the neighborhood.

d. civilized manner in which traffic is coordinated.

Ans. Option (a)

ii. ‘The urban and educated people have their minds ahead.’ Choose the option suggesting the correct meaning behind this line.

1. The people are well-educated and knowledgeable about the condition of the poor.2. The people are concentrating on the road that is ahead in order to drive safely.
3. The people are preoccupied only with the thoughts of their lives and nothing else.4. The people are focused on their goal of bettering the country.

a. Option 1

b. Option 2

c. Option 3

d. Option 4

Ans. Option (c)

iii. What do the urban rich feel about the S and N signs that have been painted wrong?

a. Tolerant

b. Amused

c. Sympathetic

d. Annoyed

Ans. Option (d)

iv. The passers-by find the sign artless but the landscape ___________.

a. animated

b. aesthetic

c. amusing

d. ancient

Ans. Option (d)

Q. No. 2) Based on your reading of the poem, choose the option that correctly lays out the difference between the city dwellers and the countryside people.

City dwellersCountryside people
1.• unaware • casual• greedy • concerned
2.• indifferent • grumpy• suffering • disappointed
3.• short-tempered • materialistic• optimistic • savage
4.• stressed • dismissing• protesting • objectionable

a. Option 1

b. Option 2

c. Option 3

d. Option 4

Ans. Option (b)

Q. No. 3) “I wonder how I should like you to come to me
And offer to put me gently out of my pain.”

The tone of the poem by the end, as depicted by the given lines is

a. frustrated.

b. commanding.

c. Introspective.

d. emotional.

Ans. Option (d)

Q. No. 4) Multiple Choice Questions based on an extract.

No, in country money, the country scale of gain,
The requisite lift of spirit has never been found,
Or so the voice of the country seems to complain,
I can’t help owning the great relief it would be
To put these people at one stroke out of their pain.
And then next day as I come back into the sane,
I wonder how I should like you to come to me
And offer to put me gently out of my pain.

i. The ‘country money’ contextually here refers to

a. money kept aside for rural development.

b. wealth accumulated by the whole country.

c. meager income earned by the countryside people.

d. riches collected by the ancestral farmers over time.

Ans. Option (c)

ii. Pick the option that mentions elements justifying the monetary aspect as the ‘requisite lift of spirit’.

  1. confidence
  2. ego
  3. self-esteem
  4. status
  5. fame

a. 1, 2, 4

b. 2, 4, 5

c. 1, 3, 4

d. 1, 3, 5

Ans. Option (d)

iii. Choose the correct option with respect to the two statements given below.

  • Statement 1: The poet is agitated and depressed.
  • Statement 2: The poet realizes the futility of his thought about giving up.

a. Statement 1 can be inferred but Statement 2 cannot be inferred.

b. Statement 1 cannot be inferred but Statement 2 can be inferred.

c. Statement 1 and Statement 2 can be inferred.

d. Statement 1 and Statement 2 cannot be inferred.

Ans. Option (b)

iv. Choose the option that correctly paraphrases the given lines from the above extract.

“I can’t help owning the great relief it would be
To put these people at one stroke out of their pain.”

a. The poet wants to kill the impoverished people.

b. The poet feels that death is better than living such a miserable life.

c. The poet wants to eliminate poverty from society.

d. The poet states that it is important that these people become rich.

Ans. Option (b)

Q. No. 5) Read the given extract to attempt the questions with reference to context.

It is in the news that all these pitiful kin
Are to be bought out and mercifully gathered in
To live in villages, next to the theatre and the store,
Where they won’t have to think for themselves anymore,
While greedy good-doers, beneficent beasts of prey,
Swarm over their lives enforcing benefits
That are calculated to soothe them out of their wits,
And by teaching them how to sleep they sleep all day,
Destroy their sleeping at night the ancient way.
(A Roadside Stand)

i. What is the tone of the poet in the above lines?

  1. aggressive
  2. tolerant
  3. sarcastic
  4. resigned
  5. sentimental

Choose the most appropriate option.

a. Only (1)

b. (2) and (3)

c. (1), (4), and (5)

d. Only (3)

Ans. Option (d)

ii. Identify the phrase from the extract, that suggests the following:

No one bothers to take ‘their’ consent before pushing the promise of a better life, their way.

Ans. Enforcing benefits

iii. What quality of the villagers can be inferred through these lines?

a. gullible

b. futuristic

c. hypocritical

d. Ambitious

Ans. Option (a)

iv. Complete the following analogy correctly. Do NOT repeat from the used example.

greedy good doers: alliteration :: __________: Oxymoron

Ans. beneficent beasts of prey

v. On the basis of the extract, choose the correct option with reference to (1) and (2) given below.

  1. The city dwellers make promises for the betterment of the villagers.
  2. The city dwellers have ulterior motives.

a. (1) is true but (2) is false.

b. (2) is true but (1) is false.

c. (2) is the reason for (1).

d. Both (1) and (2) cannot be inferred from the extract.

Ans. Option (c)

vi. Fill the blank with an appropriate word, with reference to the extract.

‘… calculated to soothe them out of their wits’ implies that ‘them’ are being _____.

Ans. manipulated/fooled/duped.

Q. No. 6) Pick the option with the slogan that is likely to be used by a person selling at the roadside stand.

Slogan 1Slogan 2Slogan 3Slogan 4
Men and women inequality; a road to dignity.By the people and for the people.I see humans but no humanity.Corruption, corruption, you leave my country. That’s all I pray!

a. Slogan 1

b. Slogan 2

c. Slogan 3

d. Slogan 4

Ans. Option (c)

Q. No. 7) Choose the option that correctly categorizes the given literary devices as per the given analogy.

selfish cars : __________ :: __________ : metaphor

a. personification; polished traffic

b. transferred epithet; trusting sorrow

c. metaphor; pitiful kin

d. oxymoron; greedy good-doers

Ans. Option (b)

Q. No. 8) Choose the option that correctly mentions the complaints made by the poet through this poem.

  1. The rich people drive carelessly on the road hitting the poor people on purpose.
  2. The city-dwellers remain highly insensitive and offhand towards the poor people.
  3. The urban people are unable to understand the struggles of the impoverished people.
  4. The goods are not being bought by wealthy people even at discounted rates.

a. 1, 2

b. 2, 3

c. 3, 4

d. 1, 4

Ans. Option (b)

Q. No. 9) Read the extract given below and briefly answer the questions that follow:

The little old house was out with a little new shed,
In front at the edge of the road where the traffic sped,
A roadside stand that too pathetically pled..

i. Why had a new shed been put up?

Ans. To make a living out of the city money.

ii. Which traffic is referred to here?

Ans. The cars and other vehicles speeding towards the city.

iii. Why is the stand’s existence said to be ‘pathetic?

Ans. Because their expectations are never fulfilled as the rich men are not considerate of them/ Because their very purpose is destroyed as city money does not flow into their hands.

iv. '..That too pathetically pled'. Name the figure of speech used.

Ans. Personification.

Q. No. 10) Though money holds the same value everywhere, the poet draws a distinction between city money and country money. Elaborate.

Ans. In the poem "A Roadside Stand," the poet Robert Frost draws a distinction between city money and country money. He implies that while money may have the same value everywhere, the way it is earned and spent in the city differs from how it is earned and spent in the country. In the city, money is acquired through complex and impersonal transactions, whereas in the country, it is earned through hard work and personal connections. The poet suggests that city money lacks the genuine human touch and simplicity found in country money.

Q. No. 11) The roadside stand and the moving cars are a contrast around which the entire poem is woven. Expound.

Ans. In the poem "A Roadside Stand," the contrast between the roadside stand and the moving cars is a central theme. The stand represents a fixed, simple, and traditional way of life in the countryside, while the moving cars symbolize fast-paced, modern, and impersonal city life. This stark difference highlights the clash between old and new, tradition and progress, and reflects the poet's contemplation on the changing times and the loss of rural simplicity.

Q. No. 12) Comment on the significance of the symbol of the car in the poem.

Ans. The symbol of the car in the poem "A Roadside Stand" represents urbanization, modernity, and progress. It contrasts with the traditional rural life depicted by the roadside stand, emphasizing the impact of urbanization on the simplicity and authenticity of the countryside.

Q. No. 13) Does the poet reach a conclusive solution for the issue at hand? Discuss.

Ans. No, the poet Robert Frost does not provide a conclusive solution for the issue at hand in the poem "A Roadside Stand." Instead, he presents the contrasting images of the roadside stand and the moving cars to provoke contemplation on the impact of urbanization and modernization on traditional rural life. The poem does not offer a definitive answer but encourages readers to reflect on the complexities of societal changes.

Q. No. 14) State any two characteristics that can be inferred about the people from the countryside in The Roadside Stand.

Ans.

  • The people from the countryside wait endlessly for the kindness of the people from the city, as shown by the poet. This demonstrates their patience/persistence.
  • They have a desire to live an ideal/a perfect/a happy life like it is shown in the movies, which shows that they are hopeful/optimistic.

Q. No. 15) 'The cry of not having money to do anything except carry on the business of making bangles, not even enough to eat, rings in every home.
(The Lost Spring)

'...far from the city we make our roadside stand and ask for some city money to feel in hand’.
(A Roadside Stand)

Create a conversation between a bangle maker and the owner of a roadside stand with reference to the above extracts.

You may begin the conversation like this:

Owner of a roadside stand: Your bangles are pretty. Tell me about your experience in this business.

Ans. Owner of a roadside stand: Your bangles are pretty. Tell me about your experience in this business.

Bangle Maker: Thank you. Well, it's a tough life being a bangle maker in Firozabad. We have been doing this work for generations, but it doesn't pay enough to meet our needs. We barely have enough to eat, let alone educate our children. The lack of education keeps us trapped in this business, and we can't find better job opportunities. It's like a vicious cycle of poverty that never ends.

Owner of a roadside stand: I can understand. We, too, struggle to make ends meet here at the roadside stand. We wait all day for city people to stop by and buy something from us. We depend on their city money to get by.

Bangle Maker: It's sad to know that we all face similar financial difficulties. In Firozabad, we fear the police, bureaucrats, and sahukars who exploit us and prevent us from forming a collective to demand our rights.

Owner of a roadside stand: Here, in the countryside, people are misled by promises from the government and other agencies pretending to help us. But in reality, our situation remains the same.

Bangle Maker: It seems like there's no easy solution for either of us to improve our financial positions. Poverty is a constant shadow, and it's disheartening.

Owner of a roadside stand: Yes, it is. We can only hope for a better future, but for now, we must carry on with our struggles.

Bangle Maker: Indeed, we must keep going. Thank you for listening and understanding our plight.

Owner of a roadside stand: Thank you for sharing your story. Let's continue to support each other as we try to survive in this harsh world.

Q. No. 16) Imagine a car stops and actually buys from the roadside stand.

Keeping in mind the reaction you think the peasants would have, write a diary entry as the farmer describing not only your immediate experience but also your after-thoughts on being able to earn “city money”.

You may begin this way:

Wednesday, 2nd March XX   9 PM

We had an unexpectedly good day today!...

Ans. Wednesday, 2nd March XX 9 PM

We had an unexpectedly good day today! As the scorching sun slowly set behind the horizon, a miracle occurred - a car actually stopped at our humble roadside stand. My heart pounded with excitement and nervousness as a well-dressed city dweller stepped out and looked at our handmade crafts.

To my amazement, the city visitor admired our work and purchased a few items. The joy in our hearts was immeasurable, and a sense of pride swelled within me. We exchanged a few words, and I noticed how different our lives were - the way we dressed, the way we spoke, and the worlds we came from - so contrasting, yet connected at that moment.

As the car drove away, leaving behind a trail of dust, I couldn't help but reflect on the significance of this encounter. Earning "city money" felt like a triumph, a glimmer of hope amidst the endless struggle for survival. With a hint of optimism, I thought about the possibilities this could bring - perhaps a chance to provide better opportunities for my children, to break free from the chains of poverty that bound our family for generations.

But even in my excitement, a part of me feared that this could be a fleeting moment of relief. The reality of our harsh lives gnawed at me, reminding me of the uncertainty that still lay ahead. Would the car return tomorrow? Would others like them to come by? Or was this just a temporary stroke of luck in an otherwise unchanging landscape?

As I lay under the starry sky, I felt gratitude mixed with apprehension. The taste of "city money" was sweet, but I knew that true change required more than occasional encounters. It demanded resilience, unity, and a collective effort to break free from the cycle of poverty. Until then, I would cherish this day as a glimmer of hope and a reminder that amidst the struggles, there still exists a chance for a better tomorrow.

Q. No. 17) Imagine a child from the farmer’s family migrates to the city for their education. As the child, write back to your family telling them whether you would or would not want to turn into a city person.

Use the context of the poem “A Roadside Stand” in mind to pen down this letter.

You may begin this way:

12, Davidson County

23 January ‘XX

Dear mom

I have been thinking about the roadside stall lately. Now that I find myself surrounded by city-people all the time, I think……………………………………..

With love

Jennifer

Ans.

12, Davidson County
23 January ‘XX

Dear mom,

I have been thinking about the roadside stall lately. Now that I find myself surrounded by city people all the time, I think about our little stand in the countryside. The memories of our hard work, the simplicity of life, and the genuine connections we shared with our customers flood my mind.

Living in the city has its perks, and I cherish the opportunity to pursue education and explore new horizons. But amidst the bustling streets and fast-paced life, I can't help but miss the tranquility of our village and the warmth of our community.

In the city, I witness both the wonders of progress and the harsh realities of urban life. The city people are always on the move, seemingly chasing something elusive. While the glittering lights and towering buildings are captivating, I see the struggles and loneliness that often lurk behind the facade.

As I navigate through this new world, I yearn for the simplicity and authenticity of our roadside stand. The city money may offer comforts and possibilities, but it cannot replace the value of genuine human connections and the sense of belonging we had back home.

For now, I am grateful for the chance to learn and grow in the city, but my heart will always carry a piece of our countryside. I hope to return someday, not as a city person, but as someone who brings back the knowledge and experiences to uplift our community and preserve the essence of our humble roadside stand.

With love,
Jennifer

Q. No. 18) Imagine you are Pablo Neruda, the poet of Keeping Quiet.

What advice might you offer to Robert Frost, the poet of A Roadside Stand, in the context of his conflicted emotions, as displayed in the given lines

The requisite lift of spirit has never been found,
Or so the voice of the country seems to complain,
I can’t help owning the great relief it would be
To put these people at one stroke out of their pain.
Pen down your advice, in a letter to Frost.

You may begin this way:

Dear Robert

I recently read your poem, "A Roadside Stand," and...

You may end this way:

I hope this advice is helpful to you. Please let me know if there is anything else I can do to support you.

Warmly,

Pablo Neruda

Ans. Dear Robert

I recently read your poem, "A Roadside Stand," and was struck by the conflicting emotions that you expressed towards the end. I understand that it can be difficult to make decisions when we are overwhelmed by our emotions.

In my own experience, I have found that taking a moment of stillness and reflection can be very helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of the situation and connecting with our own humanity and that of others. This is the message that I try to convey in my poem, "Keeping Quiet."

I would advise you to take a moment to be still and contemplative before making any decisions about the fate of the people at the roadside stand. By quieting your mind and being present in the moment, you may be able to understand their struggles and pain objectively and gain a new perspective about your own place in the world too. I also feel that by breaking from your routine and taking a moment of stillness and reflection, you might gain a deeper understanding of the situation and make a more functional decision.

I believe that this moment of reflection could help you to see beyond your conflicting emotions. We are all human, after all, and before connecting with others, and resolving their issues, we must try to connect with our own selves to advice from a place of balance and calm.

I hope this advice is helpful to you. Please let me know if there is anything else I can do to support you.

Warmly

Pablo Neruda

Also Read:
Class 12 Important Questions and Answers
A Thing of Beauty Class 12 Important Questions Answers

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